Putting A Trace On Copyrighted Booty

from the will-this-work? dept

Businessweek is running an interview with Paul Kocher of Cryptography Research about the work he's doing to offer the entertainment industry a way to track down pirates, without violating anyone's privacy. His plan is to put some code into the content itself that identifies where it was created, so that if someone is caught infringing then the material can be traced back to where it originated from. I'm a bit skeptical, even if Kocher does have a track record (he created SSL). Without knowing many of the details (and the article doesn't provide too many), I can think of plenty of ways that this could be defeated or lead to even greater scams, where people try to pin the blame for distributed content on other, innocent, victims.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
    identicon
    DV Henkel-Wallace, May 30th, 2003 @ 3:54pm

    err, watermarks?

    Isn't this just "digital watermarking" that people have been talking about for ages, and that Felton says can be cracked with differential techniques?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  2.  
    identicon
    David, May 30th, 2003 @ 4:16pm

    Previously, on Techdirt...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  3.  
    identicon
    Csharpener, Jun 2nd, 2003 @ 8:41am

    Re: err, watermarks?

    It's essentially a sliding encryption. I think the scarey thing about this technology is what they are not telling you. Even with on disk logic and such, the problem remains that a key needs to be static at some point. And how does the disk get that static key, if it's using multiple layers of dynamic encryption that are unique for every player? hmmmmm?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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