The Myth Of Interference

from the there-is-no-limit-in-spectrum dept

David Weinberger has a great article in Salon about David Reed's theories about spectrum and how so many people have been tricked into believing that spectrum is somehow "limited". This is a story that won't surprise anyone who has either read Reed's writings or seen him speak. Weinberger does a great job simplifying Reed's arguments to the point where just about anyone can understand why there isn't scarcity when it comes to spectrum - and different frequencies don't "interfere" with each other, no matter what anyone tells you. He talks about recognizing that frequency is simply a "color", and there are no limits on colors. The problems that people think are "interference" problems are really problems with the receivers - not interference on the actual spectrum itself. However, the bigger problem is with the entire way people look at the "system architecture" involved with radio frequencies. He then moves into David Isenberg territory by suggesting that the proper architecture has to end-to-end (like the internet) rather than fully centralized (like the phone system). Definitely a worthwhile read if you want to get a feel for some of the potential of open spectrum.


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    Doug, Mar 12th, 2003 @ 8:27am

    Crackpot

    It's fun watching people make fools of themselves.

    It's certainly true that we don't necessarily make the best use of the bandwidth. But that does not mean that bandwidth is unlimited.

    If Reed has some magical way to make the term "bandwidth" irrelevant, he can demonstrate it on a wired system without need of a license. When he demonstrates the ability to transmit 50 terabits per second over a mile-long hunk of power cord, then I'll begin to think that he might have something.

     

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